The Sakhu School of Psychology 

 

Instructions:

1. Select the course

2. Review reference material

3. Download the quiz for free

4. Take and return the quiz

5. Pay for the course

6. Print your certificate

 

All major credit cards, debit cards, electronic checks and other bank withdrawals are accepted through Paypal.  It is not necessary to have a Paypal account to make payments through this method.  Checks and money orders can be sent to:  The Sakhu School of Psychology, 3700 Quebec Street Suite 100-366  Denver, CO.  80207-1639.

Courses

Continuing education credit can be earned by reading the Journal of Black Psychology and/or by taking any of the courses from the:

 

Course Catalog

 

ADHD, Conduct Disorder and Children of African Descent

Continuing Education Hours:  5

Cost:  $49.00

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder in children today.  Its historical, social and political construction are significant in understanding the rise of this medical (neurobiological) diagnosis.  Children of African descent, particularly African-American males are often misdiagnosed, overly diagnosed and dually diagnosed with ADHD and Conduct Disorder.  Cultural misunderstandings and issues of bias and racism are only a few of the factors that affect this phenomenon. 

This course explores the major issues around the diagnoses of ADHD and Conduct Disorder in general and as they relate to children of African descent in particular.  The history, politics and social implications of these diagnoses are explored and cultural issues are investigated.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the symptoms of ADHD and Conduct Disorder
  • Discuss the historical emergence and medicalization of the diagnoses
  • Compare the remedies/medications associated with ADHD and Conduct Disorder
  • Identify the Subtypes of ADHD
  • Describe the role of personal prejudices and stereotypes in diagnosing ADHD and Conduct Disorder
  • List the most frequent disorders that co-occur with ADHD and Conduct Disorder

 

References:

 

Barberin, O. & Soler R. (1993).  Behavioral, Emotional and Academic Adjustment in a National Probability Sample of African-American Children:  Effects of Age, Gender and Family Structure. Journal of Black Psychology (19) 4, 423-446.

 

Davidson J. & Ford, D. (2001). Perceptions of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in one African-American Community. The Journal of Negro Education. (70) 4, 264-273.

 

Nguyen K. & Cantor G. (2006).  Historical and Cultural Institutional Analyses of the Emergence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. pp. 1-21.

 

Spencer L. & Oatts, T. (1999).  Conduct Disorder vs. Attention- Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Diagnostic Implications for African-American Adolescent Males. Education (119) 3, 514-518.

 

IQ Testing, Cultural Bias and African Descended Children

Continuing Education Hours: 5

Cost:  $49.00

 

Course Description

Intelligence testing developed within the context of the eugenics movement, extreme racial injustice and pervasive theories of genetic intellectual inferiority.  That  history is perpetuated in the face of publications such as The Bell Curve and others that continue to support those false notions and recommend further inappropriate uses of iq tests.  Contrary to those ideas many scholars have raised issues around the scientific adequacy, cultural bias and validity of iq tests.  The purpose of this course is to explore those issues and refute some of the most dangerous assumptions about iq testing.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the effects of iq testing on U.S. laws and policies
  • Describe the Eurocentric nature of the major standardized iq tests
  • Explain the threats to the scientific adequacy of iq tests
  • Discuss the impact of cultural bias and Eurocentrism on iq scores
  • Describe the significance of the Larry P. and other court cases on testing African children
  • Discuss the academic inability to operationally define intelligence

 

Required References:

 

Hilliard, A. (1996).  Either A Paradigm Shift or No Mental Measurement: The Nonscience and Nonsense of the Bell Curve.  Cultural Diversity and Mental Health (2) 1, 1-20.

 

Kwate, N. (2001).  Intelligence or Misorientation? Eurocentrism in the WISC-III. Journal of Black Psychology 27 (2), 221-238.

 

Neisser, U., Boodoo, G. et al (1996).  Intelligence: Knowns and Unknowns. American Psychologist (51) 2, 77-101.

 

Cultural Competence and Therapeutic Retention of African Descended Clients

Continuing Education Hours:  15

Cost:  $99.00

 

Course Description:

African descended clients have historically been difficult to engage in treatment.  Research suggests that African-Americans with emotional or psychological problems use mental health services at half the rate of whites with similar problems.  Furthermore, fifty percent of African-Americans discontinue services after the initial session.  This course explores the many complex issues that affect this reality.  It gives counselors a framework for understanding the cultural factors that affect therapeutic engagement and empowers them with effective tools for increasing retention rates and doing more meaningful work in the process.  This course also explores the stigma associated with seeking psychotherapy in the African-American community and the historical precedent for those feelings.  Cultural factors related to faith, politics and personal disclosures are also explored.  Issues of cultural mistrust and the impact of ethnic and cultural dyads within the context of the therapeutic alliance are also explored.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Identify the barriers to the development of a therapeutic alliance with clients of African descent
  • Discuss the stigma associated with seeking therapy and its role in the therapeutic process
  • Explain the cultural factors that assist with and challenge the therapeutic process
  • Describe the significance of cultural competence for therapists working with African descended clients
  • Identify techniques to assist in the development of a therapeutic alliance with African-American clients

 

Reference:

Parham, T. (2002).  Counseling Persons of African Descent:  Raising the Bar of Practitioner Competence.  Thousand Oaks, CA:  Sage Publications.

 

African-American Bereavement: Considerations for (concise course)

Continuing Education Hours:  7

Cost:  $59.00

 

Course Description:

How we cope with the loss of a loved one is largely determined by our cultural background and orientation. How long a person grieves, what rituals are performed around that transition, and what words one uses to express that process are all understood in the context of one's cultural values.  It is important for culturally competent therapists who work with African descended clients to have some knowledge and understanding of the traditions that exist around grief.

This course provides an overview of the traditional, contemporary and intergenerational processes of bereavement in the African/African-American community.  There is particular emphasis around the role of immediate and extended family and community, maintenance of bonds with the deceased  and the role of social support and outward expressions of grief.  The proper assessment of bereavement related disorders as culturally appropriate diagnoses are also addressed.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Identify challenges to the therapeutic process with bereaved African descended clients
  • Explain the modes of family and communal support during bereavement
  • Describe traditional ways that bereaved clients maintain continuing bonds with the deceased
  • Discuss common ways that African-American clients grieve the loss of extended kin
  • Identify issues around common diagnostic criteria for bereavement disorders

 

References:

Aborampah, O.M. (1999).  Women's Roles in the Mourning Rituals of the Akan of Ghana.  Ethnology (38) 3, 257-271

 

Laurie, A. & Neimeyer, R. A. (2008).  African-Americans in Bereavement:  Grief as a Function of Ethnicity.  Journal of Death and Dying, (57) 2, 173-193

 

Williams, B., Baker, P. & Roseman, J. (2007).  Bereavement Among African-Americans and White Older Adults.  Journal of Aging and Health, (19) 2, 313-333

 

African/African-American Culture and the Grief Process

Continuing Education Hours:  15

Cost:  $99.00

 

Course Description:

How we cope with the loss of a loved one is largely determined by our cultural background and orientation.  How long a person grieves, what rituals are performed around that transition, and what words one uses to express that process are all understood in the context of one's cultural values.  It is important for culturally competent therapists who work with African/African-American clients to have some knowledge and understanding of the traditions that exist around grief. 

This course provides an overview of the traditional, contemporary and intergenerational process of bereavement in the African/African-American community.  There is particular emphasis around the role of immediate and extended family and community, maintenance of bonds with the deceased, the role of social support and outward expressions of grief.  The proper assessment of bereavement related disorders as culturally appropriate diagnoses are also addressed. 

 

Course Objectives:

  • Identify traditional rituals around grief that are common among people of African descent
  • Explain the typical roles of family, community and caregivers during bereavement
  • Describe the inter-generational patterns of grief and the effect of acculturation on them
  • Discuss common ways that bereaved people maintain bonds with loved ones
  • Identify challenges around common diagnostic criteria for bereavement disorders

 

Required Reference:

Rosenblatt, P. & Wallace, B. (2005),  African-American Grief.  New York, NY: Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

 

Cultural and Political Issues in Testing African/African-American Children

Continuing Education Hours:  15

Cost:  $99.00

 

Course Description:

The concept of intelligence and the history of intelligence testing have been extremely controversial since their inception.  They have also been intimately connected to the history of racism and discrimination in this country and abroad.  Issues of cultural bias, scientific inadequacy, and appropriate use of iq tests are only a few of the problems that have plagued the testing movement.  From the historical use of tests to justify forced sterilzation and miscegenation laws, to contemporary utilization of iq tests to determine future academic performance and prison sentencing, iq tests have influence over numerous social and political processes despite their controversial nature.

The purpose of this course is to examine some of the issues around iq testing from the perspective of several prominent African psychologists.  Issues around validity, reliability, standardization and more will be explored through this course.  The threats to scientific adequacy, cultural and other biases and inappropriate usage of the tests will also be investigated.  In addition, the impact of several landmark court cases regarding iq testing of African-American children will also be explored.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the growth of iq testing within the context of the history of racism in the U.S. and abroad
  • Explain the threats to the scientific adequacy of iq tests
  • Describe the impact of cultural bias and culturally based communication on iq scores
  • Compare the historical and contemporary uses of iq tests
  • Describe the significance of the Larry P. and other court cases on the testing of African descended children
  • Discuss the academic inability to operationally define intelligence
  • Explain the relationship between iq, SAT scores and harm to females and people of color

 

Required Reference:

 

Hilliard, A. (1995).  Testing African-American Students.  Chicago, IL: Third World Press

 

The Process:

1.  Select a course or courses from the course catalog.

 

2.  Review the reference material.  For concise courses, download the articles associated with the course(s).  For extensive courses obtain the book(s) on your own or through the link on our website to Amazon.com or the publisher's website.  Please note that The Sakhu School of Psychology does not sell or benefit from the sale of the books so their cost is separate.

 

3.  Download the quiz free of charge.  Simply email the title of the course to ceus@SakhuSchool.com when you are ready to take it.  You will receive a user name and a password allowing you access to the quizzes page of our website.

 

4.  When your quiz is complete and ready for grading, submit it to ceus@SakhuSchool.com.

 

5.  Remit your payment to The Sakhu School of Psychology through our secured Paypal link. 

 

6.  Once your quiz is received, it is graded and your certificate is emailed to you.  Please allow between two and 72 hours for your quiz to be graded.

 

Please note:  A score of 80% must be received in order to earn a certificate and credit for the course.  Participants may take the quiz up to three times in the unlikely event that a passing score is not obtained the first time. 

Please let us know if you are having difficulty purchasing the book(s) and we will provide a copy for you.

 

Web Site Security

All credit card and other electronic payments are processed through Paypal which protects your personal and financial information with complete security and fraud protection systems.  A Paypal account is not required to use this service.  The Sakhu School of Psychology never stores your personal or financial information.